You Need Artwork for These 4 Rooms

Artwork is the soul of your décor—while the type of furnishings you own may establish the outlines of your style, it is the artwork you choose that defines the nuance and the individuality of your space. A home without art feels impersonal, so you shouldn’t skimp in selecting pictures, paintings, or prints that reflect your aesthetic. The four rooms you should start with are:

You Need Artwork for These 4 Rooms - auction king

  1. The living room: Whether you have a formal living room or you keep things more casual, your living room is often one of the larger rooms in your house and the place you are most likely to entertain guests. Thus, it is a great canvas for multiple pieces of art and for larger artworks. Over the sofa is a favorite spot for art, but you should be sure that it is in the correct proportion for the best effect. The overall display should be about two-thirds of the width of the sofa, whether you’re displaying one large painting or print or an arrangement of smaller artworks.
  1. The dining room: As another room where you’re most likely to spend time with guests, your dining room is another ideal spot for artwork. If you have detailed artwork that benefits from observation at a closer vantage point, a smaller dining room is a great place to put it. Keep in mind that art should be hung with its center point at about sixty inches off the ground, which is the average eye level for most people.
  1. The bedroom: When you think of pleasant ways to start your day, waking up to a view of a beautiful drawing or etching should easily make the list. Hang your favorites on the wall where you can easily see them from your bed for maximum enjoyment. Artwork is a fun way to personalize your children’s rooms as well. A framed sericel from their favorite animated movie or a lithograph of a beloved character makes a nice addition that’s appealing for very young children but doesn’t seem childish as they mature.
  1. The entry hall: Whether your home has a modest entrance or a sweeping hall, this room creates the first impression for anyone who enters. An abstract modern print can add a zingy pop of color, or a graphic art print of a well-known painting can invite the viewer in for a closer look.

Frankly, adding color and beauty to your surroundings is a plus for any room in your house. Don’t be afraid to mix types and styles of artwork—in fact, experts recommend doing just that for a uniquely appealing look (and to avoid the sensation that your art collection is hanging in a gallery instead of a home!).

If you’re looking to build an art collection, AuctionKing.com offers a wide selection of giclees, lithographs, sericels, mixed media artwork, and more, with new finds constantly added to their offerings. The deals you’ll find will stretch your budget further and beautify your environment faster. Sign up for a free online account and start bidding today.

What’s the Difference Between Cels and Sericels?

For fans of animation, collecting artwork from their favorite feature-length or short animated films is a way of bringing their passion for the medium into their homes. Knowing the history of how animation was produced can help you understand the difference between the two primary kinds of animation artwork you’re likely to find on the market—cels and sericels—and why their relative value can vary considerably.

Whats the difference between cels and sericels | Auction King

Prior to the advent of digital technology, animated movies were hand-drawn. The term cel is short for “celluloid,” and refers to the transparent sheets that characters were drawn on to create each frame of a movie. The outline of the character or characters in that frame would be hand-drawn on the front and then the colors painted on the back, and the entire cel shot against a static painted background for the scene. Each frame had to be painstakingly drawn and shot, one at a time. A single animated feature usually required around 100,000 cels.

This type of cel, which was used in the actual production of a movie, is known as a production cel. Studios often sold them off as collectibles after animated films were completed. However, the advent of digital technology eliminated the use of production cels—Disney has not used them since 1990, and other animation studios phased them out over the course of the following fifteen years. The worth of these one-of-a-kind items can vary considerably based on the rarity of the image, the popularity of the film or character it depicts, and the condition of the cel, but it’s not unusual to pay thousands of dollars for one piece.

Major studios recognized that demand for cels—a physical memento of favorite films or animated characters—did not diminish because the process that produced them had been left behind. Cels are still produced in limited editions for collectors. While these cels, created with the needs of aficionados in mind, tend to be more affordable than production cels, they can be quite pricey in their own right, depending on the size of the production run, the degree to which they are hand-drawn and -painted, and if they are signed.

Sericels are the most affordable option for collectors who enjoy the look of cels but do not have an unlimited budget. These images are mechanically produced with silk-screened color, which brings the cost for a collector down significantly. Some sericels are produced solely in limited editions, which can increase their price depending on how restricted the run is. Sericels may also be sold without the background that typically accompanies a limited edition cel.

The key to enjoying a collection of animation art is to know what you’re purchasing before you buy, and to prioritize your personal enjoyment of your collection. For savvy collectors, the lvie online auction at AuctionKing.com offers an opportunity to find animation art at a fraction of the prices you’ll see at commercial galleries. Sign up for a free account and check it out today.

Are Lithographs a Good Investment?

Collecting fine art is a pastime often associated with the fabulously wealthy. This isn’t just an indication that rich people appreciate culture—they have found throughout the centuries that art can be a good investment as well. It is possible for those with more limited resources to purchase artworks as an investment, and lithographs are a popular choice. Are they a good investment? The answer, as with so much in the world of fine art, is “it depends.”

Are Lithographs a Good Investment - Auction King

Lithographs are authorized copies of original works of art. Sometimes these copies are made by the artist; sometimes the copies are made by someone else. In general, print runs of lithographs are kept low to preserve the value of each individual print. While a lithograph will rarely bring as much as the original artwork, they can be quite valuable even while being relatively more affordable. If you are considering buying one, look for these factors to assess the lithograph’s worth and potential for appreciation:

Rarity: The more copies of the same lithograph there are on the market, the less any individual piece will bring. In some cases, the original plate will be destroyed after the print run, ensuring that no future copies of the piece will be made to dilute the value of existing lithographs.

Quality: The quality of the print itself can contribute or detract from the value of a lithograph. Learn what you can about the process used to produce the image, as some lithographs are printed using traditional artisanal methods, which can boost the value of individual prints.

Condition: As with any other kind of artwork, the condition of the piece itself can greatly influence its value. A well-preserved lithograph without marks, dirt, or tears will obviously be worth more than if it is damaged.

Artist: Paradoxically, a famous artist may not be your best choice for purchasing a lithograph for its investment potential. Lithographs by extremely famous artists tend to command top dollar from the outset, which means that there is less potential for growth. You may be better off looking for attractive lithographs from up-and-coming artists—the advantage here is that you’re likely to pay less at the outset.

Authenticity: You’ll want to be sure that the lithograph you purchase is in fact authorized. Many of the signs you’d expect to find on or with an authorized lithograph—a certificate of authenticity, hand numbering, and even an artist’s signature—can be faked, unfortunately, so it is best to purchase your artwork from reputable dealer or auction house you trust.

It’s worth remembering that you should be prepared to hold onto any artwork you purchase for investment potential for a long time. The value of art tends to appreciate slowly, and is subject to the whims of artistic fashion. Your best bet is to choose a high-quality lithograph that appeals to your own taste, so you can enjoy it until you decide to sell. If you’re ready to consider purchasing a lithograph, check out the live online auction at Auction King. We offer below-market prices on fine art every day. Sign up for a free account to get started.